Tok Essay Sample 2014 W2

Posted on by Yok

The Extended Essay is an individual project of 4000 words.

It is a chance to study a topic that interests you which is not covered by the syllabus.
It can cover any historical topic of your choice from within the past 10 years.
It is supervised by your History teacher, but marked by the IB board.
It will involve an emphasis on personal research and the use of primary sources.

Click on the following headings to get guidance in choosing a question and writing your study.

After the first batch of studies are marked according to the new criteria in Summer 2018, I hope to upload some particularly good studies to this website to share with everyone.

It gives you a chance to study in real depth a topic that you have an interest in.
It can relate to any period and any topic within the last 10 years.
It gives you the chance to work closely with your History teacher to 'fast-track' your historical skills with one-to-one tutoring.
As such it is a great opportunity to produce a mature academic study on something that you might never again have the chance to research.

Similarities:
Both the IA and the EE in History award students who choose an interesting question which they research thoroughly and answer coherently through critical evaluation of evidence.

Differences:
The IA is only 1500 words long; the EE is 4,000 words.
The EE requires a much heavier emphasis on the use of primary source material than the IA.
The IA is structured into specific sections; the EE is structured more flexibly.
The IA markscheme grades each section separately; the EE markscheme grades each criteria across the essay as a whole.

You will select which of your IB subjects will form the basis of your EE in the Spring Term of the first year of IB. This will usually (although not always) be one of your Higher Level subjects. The supervisor will set a series of internal deadlines and meetings for each student to ensure the completion of the study in a timely fashion.

Start by considering if there is a period / place / person / issue in history that would like to investigate further. Maybe this is something you have read a little about, watched a film about or are interested in from your other studies / hobbies. The only strict rule is that anything that happened in the past 10 years is not allowed.

The three main focuses of study tend to be focused on

  • EITHER Causes of an event / situation;
  • OR Consequences of an event / situation
  • OR Relevance of particular evidence about an event / situation (e.g. a painting, novel, film, biography).

The following resources may help you in your quest for a topic:

Online archives:

Other resources:

  • History Department Magazine collection
  • History Department DVD collection

Once you have settled upon a topic, you have to then turn this into a question - a problem that your study will solve, in other words.

The following table could help you get started

To what extent was...[Event]
[Situation]
[Development]
[Individual]
[Policy]

responsible for...

[Event]
[Situation]
[Development]
[Policy]
the most important result of...
How useful is...the Novel...
the Album...
oral testimony...
photography...
the painting...
the film...
to the historian studying...
How successful / significant was...[Individual] (e.g. politician / sportsperson / entertainer / film director / etc)in the context of...

The following list of past Extended Essay questions from the IST will also be helpful:

  • How has politics influenced Berlin's architecture over the 20th century? (Predicted 'A')
  • To what extent was World War Two a catalyst for British Decolonisation? (Predicted 'B')
  • How decisive was Spanish intervention in World War Two? (Graded 'A')
  • How far did Nietzsche's ideas influence the Third Reich? (Graded 'B')
  • How reliable is Hogarth's 'The Rake's Progress' as evidence of 18th century London? (Graded 'A')
  • How and why do Historical sources disagree about the life and career of Bonnie Parker? (Graded 'B')

You are now ready to complete the Initial Proposal Sheet and hand it to your teacher.

Make sure that this is a detailed, considered proposal. Your supervisor will schedule a meeting with you to talk about how you plan to structure your essay in particular.

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IRS : Forms

Form W-2

Form W-2: Wage and Tax Statement reports your wages and taxes withheld from your wages. Your employer is required to give you a 2017 W-2 by Jan. 31, 2018. Your employer keeps a copy for recordkeeping.

A copy of your W-2 is sent to:

  • You
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)
  • IRS
  • State or local governments for which taxes are withheld

You’ll refer to some of the W-2 boxes to complete your return. Some W-2 boxes are for informational purposes only.

W-2 Boxes

Box a: Employee’s Social Security number — If the number is incorrect due to a typographical error:

  • Report it to your employer immediately
  • Get a corrected W-2

All payments withheld from your wages are credited to the Social Security number (SSN) shown. If your SSN in the payroll system — and on your W-2 — is incorrect, your employer must fix this. An incorrect SSN means your payments aren’t credited to you for:

  • Income tax
  • Social Security
  • Medicare

Box b: Employer’s federal ID number — This is your employer’s identification number with the IRS. It’s the equivalent of your SSN or individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN). This number must be valid and match the IRS’s records if you want to e-file your return.

Box c: Employer’s name, address, and ZIP code — If you work for a corporation, this is usually the address of the main office or headquarters. It’s not necessarily the building where you work.

Boxes e and f: Employee’s name and address — Your full name and current address

Box 1: Wages, tips, and other compensation — The taxable amount of compensation your employer paid you. This includes:

  • Tips
  • Bonuses
  • Commissions
  • Wages
  • Salaries

Enter the amount in this box on Forms 1040 and 1040A, Line 7, or Form 1040EZ, Line 1.

Box 2: Federal income tax withheld — The total amount of federal income tax your employer withheld from your wages. Enter the amount in this box on:

  • Form 1040, Line 62
  • Form 1040A, Line 36
  • Form 1040EZ, Line 7

Box 3: Social Security wages — The amount of earnings your employer paid you subject to Social Security tax. This doesn’t include tips. This amount might be more than the amount in Box 1 if some income subject to Social Security tax isn’t subject to income tax. Ex: Amounts you contribute to a tax-deferred retirement plan like a 401(k) or a 403(b) plan.

For 2017, the total of Boxes 3 and 7 shouldn’t be more than $118,500.

Box 4: Social Security tax withheld — The amount of Social Security tax withheld on your wages. For 2017, this amount can’t be more than $7,347. This amount should equal 6.2% of the amount in Box 3.

If you worked for more than one employer, the total withheld might be more than $7,347. If so, the excess is treated as a tax payment. This payment will increase your refund or decrease your balance due. See Form 1040, Line 69.

Box 5: Medicare wages and tips — The total amount of earnings your employer paid you subject to Medicare tax. There’s no limit on the amount of wages that might be subject to Medicare tax.

Box 6: Medicare tax withheld — The amount of Medicare tax withheld on your wages. This amount should equal 1.45% of the amount in Box 5.

Box 7: Social Security tips — This lists the tips you received that you reported to your employer. Box 7 and Box 3 combined are used to figure the Social Security and Medicare tax you owe on tips you didn’t report to your employer.

Box 8: Allocated tips — The amount of tips your employer allocated to you. This amount is in addition to the amount you reported, which is in Box 7. The allocation is usually based on credit card receipts and IRS formulas.

If you have an amount in this box, you might need to complete Form 4137 to pay these taxes on the amount:

  • Social Security tax
  • Medicare tax

You usually must include the amount in taxable wages, Box 8 on your return. To learn when you might not need to report this amount, see Publication 531.

Box 10: Dependent care benefits — The amount of your wages used to pay for dependent care expenses under a Section 125 plan. This is also known as:

  • Cafeteria plan
  • Flexible spending arrangement

This amount isn’t included in Box 1. File Form 2441 to see if any part of this amount is taxable.

Box 11: Nonqualified plans — The total payments you received from your employer’s nonqualified retirement plan. This amount is included in Box 1 and is taxable.

Boxes 12a, 12b, 12c, 12d — These boxes are used for various reporting purposes. Some of the letter codes and their meanings include:

  • A — Social Security tax your employer couldn’t withhold since there wasn’t enough tip income to cover the tax. Include this amount in the total you enter on Form 1040, Line 60.
  • B — Medicare tax your employer couldn’t withhold since there wasn’t enough tip income to cover the tax. Include this amount in the total you enter on Form 1040, Line 60.
  • D — Pre-tax contributions to an employer’s 401(k) plan. This amount isn’t included in Box 1 and isn’t taxable to you. However, if you worked for more than one employer, you might be taxed on a portion of this amount. To learn more, see Publication 525.
  • E — Pre-tax contributions to an employer’s tax-sheltered annuity plan. This amount isn’t included in Box 1 and isn’t taxable to you. However, if you worked for more than one employer, you might be taxed on a portion of this amount. To learn more, see Publication 525.
  • F — Pre-tax contributions to an employer’s salary-reduction Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) plan. This amount isn’t included in Box 1 and isn’t taxable to you. However, if you worked for more than one employer, you might be taxed on a portion of this amount. To learn more, see Publication 525.
  • G — Pre-tax contributions to an employer’s Section 457(b) retirement plan. This amount isn’t included in Box 1 and isn’t taxable to you. However, if you worked for more than one employer, you might be taxed on a portion of this amount. To learn more, see Publication 525.
  • J — Amount of sick pay not taxable since you contributed to the plan.
  • K — 20% excise tax on excess golden parachute payments. To learn more, see Total Tax in the Form 1040 Instructions.
  • L — Amount of substantiated employee business expense reimbursements. This amount is nontaxable to you. If you’re deducting expenses more than this amount, complete Form 2106.
  • M — Former employees only. Uncollected Social Security or railroad retirement benefits on taxable cost of group-term life insurance over $50,000.
  • N — Former employees only. Uncollected Medicare tax on taxable cost of group-term life insurance over $50,000.
  • P — Amount of moving expense reimbursement paid to the employee. This amount is neither taxable nor deductible. It isn’t included in Boxes 1, 3, or 5.
  • Q — Amount of nontaxable military combat pay. Treat this amount as earned income for these purposes:
    • Earned Income Credit (EIC)
    • Additional child tax credit
    • IRA contributions
  • R — Employer contributions to your Archer medical savings account (MSA). Report it on Form 8853.
  • S — Pre-tax contributions to an employer’s SIMPLE plan. This amount isn’t included in box 1 and isn’t taxable to you. However, if you worked for more than one employer, you might be taxed on a portion of this amount.
  • T — Adoption benefits not included in Box 1. Complete Form 8839 to figure any taxable and nontaxable amounts.
  • V — Income from exercise of nonstatutory stock options included in Boxes 1, 3 (up to the Social Security wage base), and 5. For reporting requirements, see Publication 525 and the instructions for Schedule D.
  • W — Employer contributions you report on Form 8889. Include amounts you contributed using these:
    • Section 125 (cafeteria plan)
    • Health savings account (HSA)
  • Y — Deferrals under a section 409(A) nonqualified deferred compensation plan. This amount is also included in Box 1. It’s subject to an additional 20% tax plus interest.
  • AA — Designated Roth IRA contributions under a Section 401(k) plan
  • BB — Designated Roth IRA contributions under a Section 403(b) plan
  • DD — Cost of employer-sponsored health coverage. This amount isn’t taxable.
  • EE — Designated Roth IRA contributions under a governmental Section 457(b) plan.

To learn more, see Publication 525: Taxable and Nontaxable Income at www.irs.gov.

Box 13: Statutory employee, retirement plan, third-party sick pay — One of the boxes will be checked if it applies to you:

  • Statutory employee — If you’re a statutory employee, your W-2 should show Social Security and Medicare tax withheld. No federal or state taxes should be withheld.
  • Retirement plan — If you’re considered to be a participant in a qualified employer retirement plan, this box will be checked. This is true whether or not you contribute to the plan. If this box is checked, your deductible IRA contributions might be limited.
  • Third-party sick pay — If you received payments for sick pay from a third-party provider, this box will be checked. Premiums paid by your employer will be taxable to you. Amounts paid from your own contributions won’t be taxable.

Box 14: Other — This is used by your employer to provide you with additional information. It might or might not affect your return. Items commonly reported in this box include:

  • Union dues
  • United Way contributions
  • Health insurance premiums deducted
  • Educational assistance programs
  • Tier 1 and Tier 2 railroad retirement contributions
  • Lease value of vehicle provided to an employee
  • State disability insurance tax withheld
  • After-tax contributions to 401(k) plans — but not designated Roth IRA contributions
  • Wages from disposing of stock acquired by exercising incentive stock options (ISO)

Box 15: State — This includes:

  • Postal abbreviation of the state for which taxes were withheld
  • Employer’s state identification number

Box 16: State wages, tips, etc. — The amount of your wages subject to state tax. This amount might differ from the amount shown in Box 1.

Box 17: State income tax — The amount of tax withheld for the state in Box 15

Box 18: Local wages, tips, etc. — The amount of your wages subject to local income tax. This amount might differ from the amount shown in Box 1 or Box 16.

Box 19: Local income tax — The amount of tax withheld for the locality in Box 20. This amount is entered on the appropriate line of your local return.

Box 20: Locality name — The description of the place — like a city or town — that also withheld taxes.

To learn more, see these tax tips:

  • Recordkeeping
  • Your Paycheck
  • Your First Job
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